Hack Hate is an online, entirely virtual, data-driven 3-week hate crime hackathon organised by Police Rewired.

Clue are delighted to have been involved in another fantastic event organised by Police Rewired. Participants in this year’s hackathon were invited to come up with prototypes and ideas aimed at improving detection, prediction, reporting, intervention, and awareness of hate crime.

Hack Hate Clue

Experts worked with teams throughout the course of the 3 weeks to help them devise a great new prototype or find new insights in open data that could positively impact the fight against hate crime.

Clue Managing Director Clare Elford joined other judges from the Metropolitan Police, Stop Hate UK, GALOP, Inclusion London, CST, and the College of Policing at Sunday’s closing ceremony, where 11 teams presented their new projects to combat hate crime.

The event was live streamed on YouTube and the audience saw prototypes from the participants including Sweep Hate, a browser plug-in to censor offensive content; Rate the Hate, a data labelling app; Hate Hawk, a Twitter bot to make reporting of hate content easy and Be Nice, a fantastic browser extension to discourage hate speech on Twitter.

Clue presented a prize for the Best Data Mash-up, recognising the importance for interoperability in systems used to fight crime

Clue presented a prize for the Best Data Mash-up, recognising the importance for interoperability in systems used to fight crime. The winning team was Data Collator, an easy to use app for collecting data from DDPOs (Deaf and Disabled People’s Organisations) with the aim for showing that this type of hate crime in under reported. The data is available in API form, making it easier to share, and for the presentation, data collected by DDPOs was compared with police data in a dashboard showing a dramatic difference. Well done team Data Collator!

Clue - best data mashup

We are so proud to support Police Rewired events. For last year’s Hack the Police 4 event, we provided a sandbox version of Clue containing realistic fake investigation data to enable participants to develop add-ons and plug-ins for investigators. We passionately believe that through using open standards, open APIs, and collaboration, we can bring innovative tools into the hands of investigators. Crimes do not live in silos, so nor should the data, and technology providers have an obligation to make their solutions interoperable so that they can be used easily alongside others.

Crimes do not live in silos, so nor should the data, and technology providers have an obligation to make their solutions interoperable so that they can be used easily alongside others.

What was great to see at this year’s event was that all of the teams were working on complementary projects, contributing to an eco-system of prototypes, which combined could create a powerful set of tools to combat this type of crime. Congratulations on this year’s winners, we look forward to seeing some of these projects become reality very soon.

 

You may also like Clue reports from Hack the Police 4